Cameron Ross – bycatch and discard – notes from the frost pocket

Cameron Ross 2

Amended – 27 April 2015

Print making Application Supervisor Cameron Ross recently held a show of his personal work in the Gray’s Foyer.

Cameron Ross’s recent exhibition “bycatch and discard – notes from the frost pocket” was no different in that respect.

The show broke down into two parts, the lower and upper galleries. The lower gallery contained a variety of ‘collectanea’ – ceramics, multiples, found objects and other ephemera which have had some influence on his practice over a long period of making. This included work by artists Joseph Beuys and Mimmo Paladino as well as watercolorist and designer Eric Ravilious amongst others.

This area also contained a selection of some of the visual byproducts of teaching, which inform more finished works shown in the upper gallery.

The exhibition was commissioned as part of the inaugural ‘Look Again’ Festival, one of many curated and shown throughout Aberdeen City. One person Staff exhibitions are not commonly held here at Gray’s. There have been numerous exhibitions where small groups of staff or students have shown one or two pieces of work.

“This exhibition was an important opportunity for me, as an artist, to show works together in a coherent fashion, where images related to and could enter into dialogue with their neighbour, where visual concepts, sometimes generated years apart, took on new relevance and commonality when seen in relation.” Cameron Ross

1 Comment

  1. Cam Ross says:

    This exhibition was commissioned as part of the inaugural ‘Look Again’ Festival, one of many curated and shown throughout Aberdeen City. One person Staff exhibitions are not commonly held in Grays. There have been numerous exhibitions where small groups of Staff have shown one or two pieces of work, but in my memory, there has not been a solo exhibition by a member of the teaching Staff for a number of years. This exhibition was an important opportunity for me, as an artist, to show works together in a coherent fashion, where images related to and could enter into dialogue with their neighbour, where visual concepts, sometimes generated years apart, took on new relevance and commonality when seen in relation.

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